In a recent decision, the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Eastern District of Massachusetts sent a reminder to practitioners and family business owners that it is critical to maintain corporate formalities in order to avoid unintended liabilities.  In the case of  In re Cameron Construction & Roofing Co., Adv. P. No. 15-1121, 2016 WL 7241337 (Bankr. D. Mass. December 14, 2016), the Bankruptcy Court applied the concept of substantive consolidation and made the assets of a non-bankrupt related entity available to creditors in the bankruptcy proceeding.

Continue Reading Bankruptcy Court Sends Not-So-Gentle Reminder About Observing Corporate Formalities

In family businesses, disputes may arise concerning access to company information.  Owners who work day-to-day in the business typically have unfettered access to this information, while passive shareholders may feel they are “in the dark” as to the company’s decision-making and performance.  Passive shareholders depend on the “insider” owners to provide them with full and accurate information and may become suspicious of the insider owners when the information provided is delayed or incomplete.  For their part, the active owners may believe that information requests from other owners are a burden or a distraction to the company’s operation.  So, what documents are corporate shareholders entitled to review?

Continue Reading What Corporate Records do Family Businesses Need to Provide to Their Shareholders?

When family business disputes erupt, the parties often end up in court, where a judge or a jury will decide their fates.  Litigation of these cases often takes years.  In Massachusetts Superior Court, for example, the rules provide for a presumptive 22 month schedule before judgment in a so-called “fast track” case, while an “average” track case has a 36 month time-frame before judgment.  Federal courts or other states’ trial courts may have slightly faster deadlines to judgment, but the fact is that litigation in court can be a long, drawn-out exercise.  This extended time-frame not only delays the resolution of the dispute, but also can interfere with the ongoing operation of the business during the suit, as management and employees divert their attention to discovery requests, motion practice, and trial preparation over an extended period.  Not to mention the strain such a lengthy process puts on already contentious family relationships.

Continue Reading Should You Arbitrate Your Family Business Disputes?

When a family business operated as a limited liability company brings on professional management, the parties typically focus on items in the operating agreement such as capital contributions, allocations and distributions, and governance.   However, a recent Delaware Chancery Court case serves as a reminder that all provisions of a limited liability company operating agreement must be given careful consideration, including the provisions relating to advancement and indemnification rights.  In Harrison v. Quivus Systems, C.A. 12084-VCMR, the Delaware Chancery Court ruled on cross motions for summary judgment in a case where the plaintiff, the former CEO of the defendant, sought indemnification and advancement from the defendant corporation.  The court ruled in favor of the plaintiff, and awarded not only the advancement and indemnification sought, but also “fees on fees” incurred by the plaintiff in bringing the action in Delaware.

John Harrison (the plaintiff in this action) had served as the CEO of Quivus Systems, LLC (the defendant), since its inception in 2007.  In 2014, the controlling shareholder of Quivus removed Harrison as CEO, and in 2015 filed suit against Harrison in the Superior Court for the District of Columbia, alleging mismanagement and corporate malfeasance.   In response to this lawsuit, Harrison made a demand for indemnification (including advancement of expenses), which was refused by Quivus.  After this refusal, Harrison sued Quivus in the Delaware Chancery Court, leading to the ruling issued by Vice Chancellor Montgomery-Reeves on August 5, 2016. Continue Reading Family Businesses Should Carefully Consider Indemnification and Advancement Obligations Included In Limited Liability Company Operating Agreements

Directors of all corporations – including family owned businesses – owe a fiduciary duty of loyalty to the company. This duty requires a director to put the interests of the company ahead of his or her personal interest and not to divert corporate opportunities or assets for his or her own benefit.  Many state statutes further address potential conflicts of interest and allow for such conflicting interest transactions as long as the director makes prior disclosure and obtains the approval of all non-interested directors or shareholders before embarking on the transaction.  This statutory process protects the corporation from the potential damage of a self-interested deal by one or more directors.  It also provides cover for the director when acting for his or her own benefit as long as the director makes the proper prior disclosures and receives the needed approval.

Continue Reading Beware of Conflicting Interest Transactions in Family Business Management

Family owned corporations are subject to the same statutory requirements regarding entity governance as non-family owned businesses.  Thus, in order to fully comply with the applicable statute for the state where the business is incorporated, a family business should pay attention to all provisions that require annual or other ongoing action by the company.  These include:

  1. Holding annual shareholder meetings
  2. Holding formal elections of directors at shareholder meetings,
  3. Documenting actions taken by the unanimous consent of the directors without a meeting
  4. Maintaining complete records of the company’s operations and finances 

Many companies also have detailed provisions in their by-laws that spell out additional duties of directors and officers, along with shareholders’ rights and responsibilities. 

Continue Reading Do “Corporate Formalities” Matter in Family Businesses?

Welcome to Murtha Cullina’s Family Business Perspectives Blog.  This Blog is designed to identify and comment on common legal issues and current cases and developments that affect family-owned and controlled businesses.

Why focus on family-owned businesses?

Approximately 90% of businesses in the United States are family-owned or controlled.  These businesses generate over 50% of the country’s GDP.  Clearly, there are some noteworthy and very large family-owned or controlled businesses, including Walmart, Ford, and SC Johnson Company (which proudly bills itself in its ads as “a family company”), and these companies have succeeded through many generations of family management and ownership.  There are also millions of other less well-known family businesses which operate on a smaller scale or strictly in their local markets – from the corner store, to the family farm, to the manufacturing company in the local industrial park, to the real estate holding company that owns and manages commercial or residential buildings, and so on.  Regardless of the industry, all these family businesses, at one point or another, face the common issues of whether the business will transfer to a future generation, when and on what terms that may happen, and which family members will continue to be involved. 

Continue Reading Welcome to Murtha Cullina’s Family Business Perspectives Blog.